Sample Agreements
 Sample Agreements
Cast & Crew Agreement (with deferred fees)

This sample CAST & CREW AGREEMENT (WITH DEFERRED FEES) should be used when a producer (Producer) is engaging cast or crew members (Contractor), as independent contractors rather than employees, for the production of a very low (or no) budget film or video. It is for the situation where the producer has no means of paying cast and crew prior to a commercial release and where it is possible that there may not be a commercial release opportunity in the foreseeable future.

This sample agreement includes the most common terms which the Producer and the Contractor need to consider and agree.

This agreement can also be purchased as part of the Film/Video Sample Agreements Pack – Option B (No Budget) for a discounted price.

Copyright Licence for Collecting Institutions

This sample Copyright Licence for Collecting Institutions agreement should be used when a museum or other institution holding a collection of artefacts or artworks, including cinematographic or multimedia works or works of artistic craftsmanship or other copyright materials, wishes to make and publish a digital copy of a work for the purpose of facilitating public access to its collection.

Copyright Licensing Agreement

This sample Copyright Licensing Agreement should be used when a person who owns the copyright in creative content wishes to give permission to another person to use their content (whether a visual artwork, text, music, film or other content) in a particular way.

Film Loan Agreement

This sample Film Loan Agreement letter should be used on a very low budget or no budget film when the film maker or film makers wants to borrow a small amount of money from a private individual (not a bank or government agency or funding body). It is intended to be interest free until a specified repayment date and is not due for repayment until the film earns revenue

Film Location Deed of Release (no payment)

The sample Film Location Deed of Release (no payment) is for use when a film producer wants to shoot a film (including a video) on private property. It is drafted mainly from the producer’s perspective. If a producer fails to obtain a Location Release, the producer could be liable in trespass or for doing other things for which there are legal consequences.

Film/Video Partnership Deed

This sample agreement outlines what needs to be considered, both creatively and financially, when a partnership is formed to collaborate on a specific film or video project, and the parties agree to share all expenses, profits and losses associated with the film.

This sample FILM/VIDEO PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT should be used when a group of people want to work together to make a film or video. It is appropriate for low or no budget film projects where the parties cannot afford, or chose not, to establish a company vehicle for the film project. It assumes that one of the partners originated the idea or proposal for the project (whether that person is a producer, director, screenwriter or holds an option over a novel or otherwise) and approaches others to work collaboratively with him or her to make the film. If the originator is a producer who wants to retain overall control and responsibility of the project, then it will be more appropriate for the producer to use contractor or employment agreements with the director, screenplay writer and other people working on the film such as Arts Law’s sample Producer and Director Agreement. If the originator doesn’t want to be involved in the filmmaking process but merely to pay a producer to make a film in accordance with a specific brief and wants ownership of the finished product then Arts Law’s sample Video Production Agreement may be more suitable.

Sample Website Terms of Use

These sample Website Terms of Use are for use on websites either with a blog (i.e. a public "discussion board" that allows users to post their comments for others to read and comment on) or a more traditional website without a blog.

Workshop Participation Deed

This sample WORKSHOP PARTICIPATION DEED should be used when a person takes part in a workshop in which they will create copyright material, for example by writing text, composing music, creating new dance movement or coming up with new lines for a play, and possibly performs the material created.

 Info Sheets
Business Structures

This information sheet explains the difference between incorporated and unincorporated groups and some of the other issues you need to consider when looking at what business structure would suit you or your group.

Intestacy Kit - ACT

This Intestacy Kit has been developed to assist families of Indigenous artists who passed away without making a will. If the artist did leave a will, see the Wills Kit. The development of this resource is made possible through the support of Copyright Agency Ltd (CAL) and DLA Piper. For the complete version please download the document.

Intestacy Kit - NSW

This Intestacy Kit has been developed to assist the families of Indigenous artists who have passed away without making a will. The development of this resource is made possible though the support of Copyright Agency Limited (CAL). For the complete version please download the document.

Intestacy Kit - NT

This Intestacy Kit has been developed to assist families of Indigenous artists who passed away without making a will. If the artist did leave a will, see the Wills Kit. The development of this resource is made possible through the support of Copyright Agency Ltd (CAL) and DLA Piper. For the complete version please download the document.

Intestacy Kit - QLD

This Intestacy Kit has been developed to assist the families of Indigenous artists who have passed away without making a will. The development of this resource is made possible though the support of Copyright Agency Limited (CAL). For the complete version please download the document.

Intestacy Kit - VIC

This Intestacy Kit has been developed to assist the families of Indigenous artists who have passed away without making a will. The development of this resource is made possible though the support of Copyright Agency Limited (CAL). For the complete version please download the document.

Intestacy Kit - WA (post 7 August 2013)

This Intestacy Kit has been developed to assist families of Indigenous artists who passed away on or after 7 August 2013 without making a will. If the artist did leave a will, see the Wills Kit. If the artist passed away without a will before 7 August 2013 please see the Intestacy Kit - WA (pre 7 August 2013)

The development of this resource is made possible through the support of Copyright Agency Ltd . For the complete version please download the document.

Intestacy Kit - WA (pre 7 August 2013)

This Intestacy Kit has been developed to assist families of Indigenous artists who passed away without making a will. If the artist did leave a will, see the Wills Kit. The development of this resource is made possible through the support of Copyright Agency Ltd (CAL) and Jackson MacDonald. For the complete version please download the document.

Intestacy Kit – South Australia

This Intestacy Kit has been developed to assist families of Indigenous artists who passed away without making a will. If the artist did leave a will, see the Wills Kit. The development of this resource is made possible through the support of Copyright Agency Ltd (CAL) and DLA Piper. For the complete version please download the document.

Intestacy Kit – Tasmania

This Intestacy Kit has been developed to assist families of Indigenous artists who passed away without making a will. If the artist did leave a will, see the Wills Kit. The development of this resource is made possible through the support of Copyright Agency Ltd (CAL) and DLA Piper. For the complete version please download the document.

WILLS KIT NT - When an Aboriginal or Torres Straits Islander artist passes away leaving a will

This Wills Kit has been developed to assist families of Indigenous visual artists who made a will before they passed away. If the artist passed away without making a will, see the Northern Territory Intestacy kit. The development of this resource is made possible through the support of Copyright Agency Limited.

WILLS KIT QLD - When an Aboriginal or Torres Straits Islander artist passes away leaving a will.

This Wills Kit has been developed to assist families of Indigenous visual artists who made a will before they passed away. IF the artist passed away without making a will, see the Queensland Intestacy Kit. The development of this resource is made possible through the support of Copyright Agency Limited.

WILLS KIT VIC - When an Aboriginal or Torres Straits Islander artist passes away leaving a will.

This Wills Kit has been developed to assist families of Indigenous visual artists who made a will before they passed away. IF the artist passed away without making a will, see the Victoria Intestacy Kit. The development of this resource is made possible through the support of Copyright Agency Limited.

 Info Sheets
Agency agreements

Actors, musicians and bands often appoint agents or managers to act on their behalf. Visual artists often have a dealer who represents them. The manager or agent can enter into contracts that are binding on the person who appointed them (the principal). There are specific legal rules which apply to these agency relationships.

This information sheet explains what an agency is, how it is created, the authority granted to an agent, an agent's obligations, and the important terms of agency agreements. It also deals with any state legislation that applies to agents, managers and venue consultants in the entertainment industry. Bands and visual artists should also read the “Music management checklist” and “Artist-gallery checklist”.

Alternative Dispute Resolution and the Arts Law Mediation Service

Alternative Dispute Resolution or ADR are processes to resolve disputes without going to court, including by mediation and expert determination. This information sheet discusses different types of ADR and how the Arts Law mediation service works.

Business Structures for Filmmakers

Filmmaking can be undertaken by one person, or a small group, or with an extensive cast and production and post-production crew managed by a number of ‘producers’ with different job descriptions and titles. The choice of a business structure will be influenced by the complexity of the production and the risk of things going wrong in the production. This information sheet considers the advantages and disadvantages of the following business structures: operating as a sole trader; as a partnership; and as a company. Each of these business structures will be considered as well as the procedure for establishing each business structure.

Children in the creative process (ACT)

When artists work with children, whether as part of a community project or an educational workshop, or where children are actors, performers or models, specific legal obligations and duties arise.

This information sheet outlines the legal issues artists or arts organisations in the Australian Capital Territory should consider when they contemplate working with or using children in any part of the creative or artistic process. It covers the duties of employers and the requirements for police and working with children checks.

It also summarises ACT laws relating to child pornography and obscenity.

National laws as well as State and Territory laws are relevant. It is important to read this information sheet in conjunction with the information sheet Children in the creative process – Australia.

Children in the creative process (NSW)

When artists work with children, whether as part of a community project or an educational workshop, or where children are actors, performers or models, specific legal obligations and duties arise.

This information sheet outlines the legal issues artists or arts organisations in New South Wales should consider when they contemplate working with or using children in any part of the creative or artistic process. It covers the duties of employers and the requirements for police and working with children checks.

It also summarises NSW laws relating to child pornography and obscenity.

National laws as well as State and Territory laws are relevant. It is important to read this information sheet in conjunction with the information sheet Children in the creative process – Australia.

Children in the creative process (NT)

When artists work with children, whether as part of a community project or an educational workshop, or where children are actors, performers or models, specific legal obligations and duties arise.

This information sheet outlines the legal issues artists or arts organisations in the Northern Territory should consider when they contemplate working with or using children in any part of the creative or artistic process. It covers the duties of employers and the requirements for police and working with children checks.

It also summarises NT laws relating to child pornography and obscenity.

National laws as well as State and Territory laws are relevant. It is important to read this information sheet in conjunction with the information sheet Children in the creative process – Australia.

Children in the creative process (QLD)

When artists work with children, whether as part of a community project or an educational workshop, or where children are actors, performers or models, specific legal obligations and duties arise.

This information sheet outlines the legal issues artists or arts organisations in Queensland should consider when they contemplate working with or using children in any part of the creative or artistic process. It covers the duties of employers and the requirements for police and working with children checks.

It also summarises QLD laws relating to child pornography and obscenity.

National laws as well as State and Territory laws are relevant. It is important to read this information sheet in conjunction with the information sheet Children in the creative process – Australia.

Children in the creative process (SA)

When artists work with children, whether as part of a community project or an educational workshop, or where children are actors, performers or models, specific legal obligations and duties arise.

This information sheet outlines the legal issues artists or arts organisations in South Australia should consider when they contemplate working with or using children in any part of the creative or artistic process. It covers the duties of employers and the requirements for police and working with children checks.

It also summarises SA laws relating to child pornography and obscenity.

National laws as well as State and Territory laws are relevant. This information sheet must be read in conjunction with the general information sheet Children in the creative process – Australia since that fact sheet explains how the various federal laws operate. This information sheet explains how the South Australia laws relate to you as an artist working with children. It includes information about the employment of children, background checks, pornography and obscenity offences and the application of classification legislation in South Australia.

Children in the creative process (TAS)

When artists work with children, whether as part of a community project or an educational workshop, or where children are actors, performers or models, specific legal obligations and duties arise.

This information sheet outlines the legal issues artists or arts organisations in Tasmania should consider when they contemplate working with or using children in any part of the creative or artistic process. It covers the duties of employers and the requirements for police and working with children checks.

It also summarises TAS laws relating to child pornography and obscenity.

National laws as well as State and Territory laws are relevant. It is important to read this information sheet in conjunction with the information sheet Children in the creative process – Australia.

Children in the creative process (VIC)

When artists work with children, whether as part of a community project or an educational workshop, or where children are actors, performers or models, specific legal obligations and duties arise.

This information sheet outlines the legal issues artists or arts organisations in Victoria should consider when they contemplate working with or using children in any part of the creative or artistic process. It covers the duties of employers and the requirements for police and working with children checks.

It also summarises VIC laws relating to child pornography and obscenity.

National laws as well as State and Territory laws are relevant. It is important to read this information sheet in conjunction with the information sheet Children in the creative process – Australia.

Children in the creative process (WA)

When artists work with children, whether as part of a community project or an educational workshop, or where children are actors, performers or models, specific legal obligations and duties arise.

This information sheet outlines the legal issues artists or arts organisations in Western Australia should consider when they contemplate working with or using children in any part of the creative or artistic process. It covers the duties of employers and the requirements for police and working with children checks.

It also summarises WA laws relating to child pornography and obscenity.

National laws as well as State and Territory laws are relevant. It is important to read this information sheet in conjunction with the information sheet Children in the creative process – Australia.

Children in the creative process - Australia

Federal, State and Territory laws all impact on how an artist works with children as part of the creative or artistic process. This information sheet looks at Australia’s national laws relevant to working with children including the censorship regime related to the classification of films, computer games and other publications.

This information sheet must be read together with the information sheet that is specific to the state or territory in which the artist is working.

Classification and censorship

Artists should be aware that they might be required to have their works classified. Whether an artist has an obligation to have a particular work classified depends on a number of factors, including the medium of the work, its content and how it is being used.

This Information sheet explains the different classification systems that apply to different types of creative works including films, computer games, publications and artworks as well as the available exemptions such as for festivals. This scheme is administered by the Classification Board. This information sheet also discusses the regulation of content for television, radio and internet by the Australian Communications and Media Authority as well as the voluntary labelling guidelines for audio tapes, records and CDs that have been developed by the Australian Record Industry Association (ARIA) and the Australian Music Retailers' Association (AMRA).

Contracts: A glossary of jargon

When negotiating, discussing, entering or arguing about an agreement, a vocabulary of unfamiliar word and expressions may be introduced into the conversation.

This information sheet contains a list of some of the more common legal terms that you might come across in negotiations as well as words and expressions that may appear in an agreement. This information sheet should be read in conjunction with Arts Law’s information sheet Contracts: An introduction

Copyright

Copyright provides a way for artists to protect and monetise their creativity. Knowing how to license copyright and earn a royalty gives artists a way to make money from their work. Knowing what to do if someone makes an unauthorised copy is also vital. This information sheet will introduce you to some of the copyright basics.

Arts Law has a number of sample copyright licences, as well as an information sheet on ‘Copyright infringement and letter of demand”. 

Copyright Collecting Societies

Collecting societies collect royalties on behalf of their members. Their members are artists, authors, musicians and other owners of copyright in works (such as music, lyrics, visual art and literature) or other copyright material (such as sound recordings, films, and television broadcasts). They may also be visual artists entitled to resale royalties in respect of their visual artworks.

Creative Commons

Creative Commons (CC) is a non-profit organisation which provides a set of free, generic licences which creators of intellectual property can use to distribute their work to the public digitally. It was launched in the United States in 2001 founded on the concept that people can contribute to a shared 'commons' of creative works by effectively giving up certain rights in a copyright work and allowing others freely to use, adapt, modify and distribute this work.

Debt recovery letter of demand

This information sheet explains the function of a letter of demand for debt recovery. It includes a sample letter of demand for the recovery of money following your supply of goods or services (eg. sale of artwork, performance fees) to a person or organisation.

Debt recovery – small claims procedure (information for Artists) (QLD)

This information sheet provides an introduction into about how one can chase outstanding payment in Queensland. It provides clarification on the small claims procedure in Queensland.

Debt recovery – small claims procedure (VIC)

When chasing payment for goods or services, the first step is generally to send a letter of demand to the other party telling them of the dispute and the money outstanding, and giving them a defined period within which to settle the matter or else face legal action.

This information sheet assumes that the contracts under which money is owed are legally enforceable, and that the debts are not subject to the National Consumer Credit Protection Act 2009 (Cth)or the National Credit Code. If you are unsure, please contact Arts Law on (02) 9356 2566 or toll-free on 1800 221 457.

When chasing payment for goods or services, the first step is generally to send a letter of demand to the other party telling them of the dispute and the money outstanding, and giving them a defined period within which to settle the matter or else face legal action.

When sending a letter of demand, you should be careful not to:

·         harass the debtor – they have the right to complain about this behaviour to particular government agencies and the police; or

·         send a letter which is designed to look like a court document because this is illegal.

A guideline on acceptable and unacceptable debt collection practices is published by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission and the Australian Securities & Investment Commission (ASIC) It is available at the ASIC websiteas ASIC Regulatory Guide 96 - Debt collection guideline: for collectors and creditors; and is also available at the ACCC website.

For assistance with drafting This information sheet assumes that the contracts under which money is owed are legally enforceable, and that the debts are not subject to the National Consumer Credit Protection Act 2009 (Cth)or the National Credit Code. If you are unsure, please contact Arts Law on (02) 9356 2566 or toll-free on 1800 221 457.

Defamation law (for material published after January 2006)

Artists often have questions about whether their work defames someone. This information sheet describes the law of defamation (sometimes called libel or slander) as it applies to work published after January 2006. It explains how to minimise the risk of defamation and what the defences are if you are threatened with a defamation action. 

Defamation law (for material published before January 2006)

Artists often have questions about whether their work defames someone. This information sheet describes the law of defamation (sometimes called libel or slander) as it applies to work published before January 2006. It explains how to minimise the risk of defamation and what the defences are if you are threatened with a defamation action. 

Disclaimers, exclusion clauses and risk warnings

This information explains the difference between a disclaimer and an exclusion clause in a contract and the circumstances when a risk warning should be used. It explains when you should use them, what they mean and the effectiveness of such clauses or statements in limit liability for injury, loss or damage. This information sheet should be read in conjunction with our insurance and liability information sheet.

Film competitions

Entering a film competition creates a binding contract between the film maker and the competition organiser. It is important to understand the competition’s terms and conditions. These might include requiring the entrant to give the competition organisers a copyright licence or assignment and a warranty that all underlying copyright has been cleared. This information sheet talks about typical terms and conditions in competitions and what to look out for. Arts Law routinely reviews the terms and conditions of current competitions and film makers should check to see whether their competition has been reviewed here

Film Financing

This information sheet looks at domestic and international sources of funding for film, television and games developers including both funding by way of grants (e.g. Screen Australia) or investment. Free-to-air broadcasters and pay television channels may provide partial funding for film and television programming. Film distributors may assist in the financing of feature films and distributors and publishers of computer games are possible sources of financing for computer games. A number of funding options exist, including the “Producer Offset”/ “Producer Rebate” scheme, and private avenues such as crowd funding. Each of these funding options is explored in more detail in this information sheet. Arts Law has a sample Film Loan Agreement and a Games Loan Agreement which may be relevant.

Film Location Releases

If you are filming on private property or in a public space (such as a park or council land), you may need a film location release. This information sheet when and why a film location release is important. Information is also provided on which parties should be contacted to obtain film location releases. Arts Law has two sample film location deeds of release (with payment and without payment).

Filming in public places

This information sheet outlines the legal issues film makers should consider when shooting in public places, including filming live performances and public figures, whether they are filming or recording copyright material (e.g. graffiti, logos, music) and whether their film may be defamatory. Film makers should also read our information sheet, Film location releases and our sample Film location deed of release (with and without payment).

Freedom of expression

The Australian Constitution does not expressly protect the freedom of expression and there are also limitations that can inhibit creative freedom in some situations, including defamation, anti-vilification, classification and censorship laws and the treason and urging violence offences. 

Liability and insurance

Accidents can happen when you operate a business or conduct your creative activity. It is important you understand your ‘liability’ or legal responsibility to compensate for damage or injury to people and property. This information sheet explains liability, risk management  and insurance. 

Moral rights

Moral rights protect the personal relationship between a creator and their work even if the creator no longer owns the work, or the copyright in the work. Moral rights concern the creator’s right to be properly attributed or credited, and the protection of their work from derogatory treatment. This information sheet provides an overview of moral rights and what constitutes infringement, it should be read in conjunction with the Moral rights infringement and letter of demand information sheet.

Moral rights infringement and letter of demand

Moral rights protect the personal relationship between a creator and their work even if the creator no longer owns the work, or the copyright in the work. If you receive legal advice that your moral rights have been infringed, it may be appropriate to send a letter of demand. This information sheet explains what a letter of demand is and contains a sample letter of demand. This information sheet should be read in conjunction with the information sheet on Moral rights

Patents

Patents are a way of protecting inventions. If you have created a useful product or process, you may be entitled to register a patent. This information sheet provides a description of the types of inventions eligible for patent protection. It also provides an outline of how to apply and who can apply for a patent, as well as information on business method patents.

Social Media for Artists

The Internet provides artists with a platform to access a worldwide audience for their work.  Social media, in particular, is a ready-made do-it-yourself mechanism for distributing, promoting, exhibiting and even selling creative content whether music, visual art, film, literature or other multi-platform art forms. This information sheet addresses the legal issues that can arise for artists using social media to publish their work.

Superannuation and contract for services

This information sheet provides a summary of, and guide to, the superannuation guarantee charge, including the different aspects of superannuation and the responsibilities of employers, employees and self employed workers.

Trade marks

An explanation of who can apply for a trade mark, how to register a trade mark, and what can be registered as a trade mark. An overview of the registration process, reasons why a application may be refused and preventing others to use your trade mark.

 Articles
Arts Law advocates for Greater Transparency in Fees charged by Copyright Collecting Societies

Arts Law has successfully pursued changes to the information available on the websites of three major Australian collecting societies. We were concerned about the calculation of the commissions they deduct from the royalties collected on behalf of their members.

From WIPO, Geneva: IGC 19 Report

The 19th session of WIPO’s Intergovernmental Committee on Intellectual Property and Genetic Resources, Traditional Knowledge and Folklore (IGC) was held in Geneva, WIPO Headquarters, 18-22 July 2011. We (Trish Adjei and Louise Buckingham) went along as observers for Arts Law. We were also privileged to participate in the Indigenous Caucus during the meeting.

Solids Arts – Respecting and protecting Indigenous intellectual property

In 2010 the Arts Law Centre of Australia (Arts Law) was contracted through the Cultural Ministers Council to further develop the Indigenous intellectual property toolkit resource over three years (2010-2012). This project has been titled Solid Arts and will include a resources across a number of mediums.

 News & Events
Answers for Artists: a Guide to Basic Legal Issues for Artists 2012 OUT NOW!

Arts Law's new 2012 publication Answers for Artists: a Guide to Basic Legal Issues for Artists has been released in English.

The original 2007 version is available in 2 bi-lingual versions, Chinese/English and Arabic/English.

This is a free resource.

Film Law and Business Essentials Workshop

Everything you need to know about the business of film

DATE: Saturday 4 May 2013, 10am - 5pm

WHERE: Iris Cinema, 13 Morphett Street, Adelaide

Are you a filmmaker in Adelaide?  Arts Law, in partnership with the Media Resource Centre, will be conducting a 1 day film law and business workshop in Adelaide.

 Audio & Video
 Other Organisations
Artists in the Black – Arts Law’s Indigenous service

The Arts Law Centre of Australia (Arts Law) established the Artists in the Black (AITB) service in 2004, in response to the needs of the Indigenous arts community. AITB aims to increase access to advice and information about the legal rights of Indigenous artists, communities and arts organisations. Arts Law provides these services to Indigenous artists in a culturally appropriate way.

Blackscreen

The National Film and Sound Archive’s Black Screen program provides Indigenous communities and the broader Australian public with access to Indigenous films.

Film Victoria- Location Gallery

The aim of Film Victoria’s Locations Gallery Indigenous Map is to easily coordinate a consultative process between filmmakers and Victorian Indigenous groups. This map enables filmmakers to easily identify and contact specific Aboriginal groups to facilitate discussion surrounding areas of cultural sensitivity.

Media Entertainment and Arts Alliance (MEAA)

The Alliance is the union and professional organisation which covers everyone in the media, entertainment, sports and arts industries. There are over 36,000 members which include people working in TV, radio, theatre & film, entertainment venues, recreation grounds, journalists, actors, dancers, sportspeople, cartoonists, photographers, orchestral & opera performers as well as people working in public relations, advertising, book publishing & website production. MEAA can provide information to members about minimum standard hourly rates.

Screen Australia

Screen Australia is the key federal Government direct funding body for the Australian screen production industry. Its functions are to support and promote the development of a highly creative, innovative and commercially sustainable Australian screen production industry.

Screen NSW

Screen NSW aims to stimulate creative and business opportunities in the screen industry. Screen NSW has a leadership role in promoting partnerships across the sector and providing "more than money" in connecting individuals and organisations, providing information through regular industry events, and supporting a vibrant and informed screen community.

Screen Producers Association of Australia (SPAA)

SPAA is the industry body that represents Australian independent film and television producers on all issues affecting the business and creative aspects of screen production. SPAA members include television, feature film, animation, documentary, TV commercial and interactive media production companies as well as services and facilities providers such as post-production, finance, distribution and legal companies.

Screenrights

Screenrights is a rights management and royalty collection service for rights holders in film and television. It administers statutory licences that allow educational institutions (school, TAFE or university) and governments to copy material from radio and television.

ScreenWest

ScreenWest is Western Australia's screen funding and development agency, committed to working in partnership with the screen industry to develop, support and promote film, television and digital media production in Western Australia.