Common questions

  1. What is AITB?
  2. Who does AITB help?
  3. How is AITB funded?
  4. How can AITB help me?
  5. How do I request advice?
  6. How long does it take to receive advice?
  7. Is my information confidential?
  8. What educational services does AITB offer?
  9. What else does AITB do to protect artists’ rights?
  10. How can I support AITB?

1. What is AITB?

The Arts Law Centre of Australia (Arts law) established the Artists in the Black (AITB) service in 2004, in response to the needs of the Indigenous arts community. AITB aims to increase access to advice and information about the legal rights of Indigenous artists, communities and artists organisations. Arts Law provides these services to Indigenous artists in a culturally appropriate way.

2. Who does AITB help?

The AITB service provides legal help to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists and their organisations.

If you are a non-Indigenous artist requiring legal help, please visit the Arts Law website to find out about our other services.

3. How is AITB funded?

The Arts Law Centre of Australia (Arts Law) is a not-for-profit organisation. Arts Law receives funding for its services, including the AITB program, from a range of sources. This includes grants from government and non-government organisations.

Click here to see our funding supporters.

4. How can AITB help me?

Arts Law provides Indigenous artists access to our full range of services, including:

  1. Free telephone legal advice
  2. Publications
  3. Review of contracts
  4. Access to culturally sensitive resources and information
  5. Referrals to other qualified solicitors across Australia where Arts Law is unable to assist.
  6. Lobbying for law reform where necessary
  7. Educational workshops and seminars on your rights as an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander.

5. How do I request advice?

You can request advice in two ways:

  • Ask for help online by filling out our online legal query form

OR

  • Call: 1800 221 451 (TOLL FREE)

We do not accept requests for legal advice by post or direct email.

To find out more information about what types of legal advice we can provide, and the legal advice process, please click here.

6. How long does it normally take to receive advice?

We will endeavour to return any telephone message or email within 3 working days, although in periods of high demand it may take up to 10 days. You will speak to an Arts Law administrative officer or volunteer who will record the relevant information in relation to your query.

If you are requesting legal advice which does not involve a document, your request will be placed in a queue. You should receive telephone legal advice from an Arts Law lawyer within 5-10 working days. If your legal query requires a document to be reviewed this will usually be organised within 2-3 weeks of your request.

7. Is my information confidential?

Yes, Arts Law respects your rights to privacy and confidentiality. All information you provide to Arts Law will be kept confidential unless you give us permission to disclose information about you to a third party or we have a legal obligation to do so.

8. What educational services does AITB offer?

Through the AITB program Arts Law prepares and presents educational workshops and seminars on your rights as an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander artist. Arts Law’s solicitors are also available to assist in curricula development and review for tertiary and vocational training purposes.

To enquire about this service, please email aitb@artslaw.com.au.

9. What else does AITB do to protect Artists’ rights?

Arts Law aims to provide targeted, quality advocacy on law and policy reform, for the benefit of the creative sector.  Because of the lack of other services dealing with Arts Law issues for Indigenous artists, Arts Law  plays an important advocacy role, particularly in relation to Indigenous Cultural and Intellectual Property (ICIP).

This advocacy work is done through:

  1. Identification and prioritization of issues that affect the arts community generally and Indigenous artists specifically;
  2. Research and making of submissions;
  3. Developing relationships with the Government, media, arts sector and other relevant bodies; and
  4. Lobbying to influence the decision making of Government and other bodies.

To find out more information about our current advocacy work, please click here.

10. How can I support AITB?

The AITB service would not be possible without the support of many generous individuals and organisations.  There are many ways you can assist us in continuing to provide this service:

  • You can make a tax free donation to Arts Law to assist us continue to provide Indigenous artists and arts organisations with legal assistance. To make a donation, please click here.
     
  • Volunteer your skills and time as a volunteer lawyer on our Document Review Service Panel, as a volunteer note-taker at a document review consultation or as a daytime volunteer administration/research assistant.